Trying to find land’s true worth

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By CRAIG MURPHY
Of the Keizertimes

How much is city property in Keizer Station Area B worth?

City officials aren’t sure.

As such, agents of the Keizer Urban Renewal Agency unanimously approved a request Aug. 18 to have an appraisal done on city-owned commercial properties along Lockhaven Drive between the Keizer Transit Center and the radiology parcel at the corner of Lockhaven and McLeod Lane.

URA agents – who also double as Keizer City Councilors – unanimously approved the request without any comments. The appraisal costs are estimated to be $3,500. The URA’s share is $2,900 with the remaining $600 from the city’s Street Fund.

Susan Gahlsdorf explained the need in a memo to URA members.

“Due to the upswing in the economy and increasing development in Keizer Station, staff recommends having an appraisal conducted so that the city is prepared for possible transactions,” Gahlsdorf wrote.

City attorney Shannon Johnson noted a current value isn’t known.

“There is not a current appraisal on the property,” he said.

In other council business Aug. 18:

• There have been a couple of stories lately about Keizer Police Department officer Scott Keniston’s new K-9 partner, Bruno.

Councilors authorized Keniston to acquire his former K-9 partner, Bas, from the city for $1. Bas was retired from police duty due to age and physical ailments.

“He aged out of his job,” police chief John Teague said when asked by councilor Jim Taylor.

“I know what that is like,” Taylor quipped.

Teague noted Bas will now be a Keniston family dog. Council president Joe Egli liked the idea.

“There’s no better place for the dog to be than where he spent the last few years,” Egli said.

• Taylor also wanted clarification on a request for a new agreement with Kentucky Underground Stage Inc. for online document storage. The city first entered into an agreement with KUSI in 2011, with that three-year agreement ending Sept. 3.

“City manager, this is not really an underground storage is it?” Taylor asked Chris Eppley.

Eppley chuckled as he replied.

“That’s the name of the company,” the city manager assured Taylor. “They do data storage. It’s important to have our data stored off site in case of a natural disaster at this site.”

• This year’s city budget includes a Code Enforcement position being brought back. The person filling the new position will now have a new vehicle, as council approved the purchase of a 2014 Ford Transit Connect from Landmark Ford for $25,343.

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